Acting: From First Audition to Final Bow

Acting: From First Audition to Final Bow - Bruce Carroll


A fun introduction to the world of acting.

From preparing for auditions to learning about rehearsals and stage setup, this book includes everything you'll need to know for getting into the world of acting. It's presented in a clear and easy to read manner.

I think this would be a great piece for high schools to give to students who have decided to try out for the play/musical. 

I very much enjoyed reading it, although I haven't acted (or even thought about acting) since I was in high school. But this definitely would have helped me out back then!

An enjoyable and educational read. 


Some Bio Information

A native of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Bruce Carroll works as a professional magician. He performs at numerous private events and has been the official street magician at Six Flags Great America for two seasons. For him, writing is a way to get things out of his head.

Bruce currently lives in Burlington, Wisconsin with his wife Angie and their daughter Heather. Follow him on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorBruceCarroll/.


Q&A

1. What inspired you to write this book?

I directed a community theater production and was surprised at how many of the actors – even those who had been in several productions – didn’t have what I considered basic acting skills. I originally thought of offering an acting workshop as a way of getting all of the participants “on the same page” for future productions. My notes for that workshop quickly became a book. Some day maybe I’ll actually present the workshop.

2. Describe your writing style in 3 words.

Light. Informative. Improving.

3. Who did you write this book for?

Primarily for myself, although I also had the cast of the production I had directed in mind. Anyone who might be thinking of acting (either as a hobby or professionally) could benefit from the book.

4. Can you tell us a bit about your writing process?

My writing process is currently changing, which is part of the “improving” description above. For this book, I made it a point to write at least one sentence every day. Usually one sentence led to others, but I never let myself have an excuse for not writing. I could write, “I don’t know what to write today,” but I never let myself write nothing.

I am now working on a series of short stories (which may or may not become a novel) and I am interviewing the major characters, much like the Hot Seat exercise described in Acting. I am also focusing on one or two days per week devoted entirely to writing.

5. Was there a point in your life when you decided you wanted to write?

Yes, I realized I wanted to write when I realized I had enough notes for a book. Actually, that was when I realized I wanted to publish a book. I’ve been writing for quite some time. Mostly garbage.

6. What’s your ultimate writing goal?

To earn a modest income; enough so that I can retire from performing and not have to work for “the Man.”

7. If you could give just one piece of advice to aspiring actors, what would it be?

Read my book.

But seriously, I would say, don’t aspire, act!

I once worked as a shift manager in a family restaurant. One of the employees would go on and on about how she was going to be a famous Hollywood actor. But she could never bring herself to smile or even look like she wanted to be there.  Of course, that affected her job. But she also missed a golden opportunity to play a role five days a week.

So my advice to aspiring actors is act. Find opportunities. Make opportunities. Audition for your local community theater. Then audition for the next production, and the one after that. Get some friends together and prepare and perform a skit at a church, a library, or even your own back yard. Act, act, act. Once you’ve done ten thousand hours of performing (probably a lot less), you’ll have the skills you need